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Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

4 edition of Amargosa vole (Microtus californicus scirpensis) found in the catalog.

Amargosa vole (Microtus californicus scirpensis)

Amargosa vole (Microtus californicus scirpensis)

recovery plan

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  • 12 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 1 in Portland, Or .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Microtus -- California,
  • Voles -- California,
  • Endangered species -- California

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesFinal recovery plan for the Armagosa [sic] vole
    ContributionsU.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Region 1
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationvi, 43 p.
    Number of Pages43
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14486963M
    OCLC/WorldCa40306428

    Perhaps the most important protections come at a critical time for our favorite endangered rodent, the Amargosa vole. The vole is a charming and charismatic little creature which dwells in the lush wetlands surrounding the town of Tecopa, California. It is considered one of the most endangered mammals in North America, as its total population. The Amargosa vole is an endangered mammal isolated to the wetlands associated with the Amargosa River. Biologists determined in that the endangered Amargosa vole had an 82 percent chance of going extinct within the next five-years, if immediate management actions were not taken. So BLM California, U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, researchers.

      In the classic movie "The Wizard of Oz," Dorothy, the Tinman, and the Scarecrow feared "lions and tigers and bears." As a reflection of today's litigious society, the Amargosa vole, Pacific pocket mouse, and Carolina heelsplitter are among the creatures that make the pest management industry's proverbial heart stop beating.   Habitat conservation urgently needed Despite the welcome rains in California this year, the fate of endangered Amargosa voles that depend on rare marshes in the Mojave Desert remains dire, with only about animals remaining in the wild and most of their habitat degraded or dying. Comprehensive planning to mitigate human-caused climate change, secure water, restore and .

    Get directions, maps, and traffic for Amargosa Valley, NV. Check flight prices and hotel availability for your visit. Lookup People, Phone Numbers, Addresses & More in Amargosa Valley, NV. Whitepages is the largest and most trusted online phone book and directory. We use cookies on this site to enhance the visitor experience. By using this site, you agree to this use. Learn more. Got It.


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Amargosa vole (Microtus californicus scirpensis) Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Amargosa vole is unique to the Mojave Desert, and today, scientists estimate there are only about remaining in the wild. Though the Amargosa vole is rarely seen by humans, biologists recognize that it is a key link in the native food chain. Predators, including raptors and water birds, share the desert marshes where they live, and the Author: Angela Barlow.

The Amargosa vole (Microtus californicus scirpensis) is a desert subspecies of the widely distributed California vole (M. californicus). The Amargosa vole inhabits highly localized and isolated wetlands in the central Mojave Desert in extreme southeastern Inyo County, just east of Death Valley National Park.

Non-profit organization working toward a sustainable future for the Amargosa River and Basin. The Amargosa vole is a subspecies of the California vole and is found in the Amargosa River drainage in the Mojave Desert. For many years, this species was thought to be extinct until rediscovered in the s in marshes along the river near Tecopa and Tecopa Hot Springs of Inyo County.

Voles are stout, mouse-like rodents with short tails. Amargosa Vole Conservation Project, Davis, California. likes. The Amargosa vole is a critically endangered small mammal native to the Mojave desert.

They live among the unique marshes of the. Despite the welcome rains in California this year, the fate of endangered Amargosa voles that depend on rare marshes in the Mojave Desert remains dire, with only about animals remaining in the wild and most of their habitat degraded or dying.

Yet techniques to modify vole habitat could create sustainable patches for them to live. Captive voles initially rejected fresh cuttings of native Olney's Three-square Bulrush (Schoenoplectus americanus), the dominant plant in the wild Amargosa Vole diet, although they consumed all.

Related to this major goal are a collection of projects that include assessing various species' health in the wild and managing disease and other stressors in endangered and threatened species, such as the American pika, the endangered Amargosa vole, and the endangered San Joaquin kit fox.

The Amargosa vole is a highly endangered rodent endemic to a small stretch of the Amargosa River basin in Inyo County, California. It specializes on a single, nutritionally marginal food source in nature.

As part of a conservation effort to preserve the species, a captive breeding population was established to serve as an insurance colony and a source of individuals to release into the wild as.

Amargosa Conservancy executive director Patrick Donnelly displays a stem from a three square bulrush, the marsh grass which is needed for the now endangered Amargosa vole, during a habitat.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

the Amargosa vole has been given a recovery priority of6, meaning that it is a subspecies under high threat with a low recovery potential. TAXONOMY Information addressing the taxonomic history ofthe genusMicrotus is available from Tamarin ().

The Amargosa vole is one of 17 subspecies ofthe California vole (Hall ). The hoc Amargosa vole team, consisting of federal, state and private organizations, aims to determine the status of and major threats to the Amargosa vole, fundamental aspects of its biology, and how recovery actions can target genetics, disease, habitat factors, demographic problems, and other threats to improve the chances that this species.

Despite the welcome rains in California this year, the fate of endangered Amargosa voles that depend on rare marshes in the Mojave Desert remains dire, with only about animals remaining in. Amargosa voles, small rodents that inhabit rare marshes of the Mojave Desert, have faced dire circumstances in recent years.

Loss of habitat, extreme drought and climate change brought this subspecies of the California vole to near extinction, leaving only a few hundred clinging to existence. It is now one of the most critically endangered mammals in North America.

Get this from a library. Amargosa vole (Microtus californicus scirpensis): recovery plan. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Region 1.;]. Janet Foley, a veterinary professor at the University of California, Davis, said the fire burned 10 to 20 percent of the remaining natural habitat for the Amargosa vole, a small, brown critter.

So, we planned a trip through Death Valley and planned a stay at the Amargosa Hotel in Death Valley Junction. I read up on the history of Marta Becket and became very excited to stay here.

human being in my book. Read more. Helpful. Comment Report abuse. Jennifer Wilcox. out of 5 stars Excellent documentary. Reviewed in the United. Microtus californicus (Amargosa Vole) is a species of rodents in the family cricetids.

It is listed as US federal Endangered status by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. It is associated with freshwater habitat. Amargosa Vole is found in the Nearctic. It is a herbivore.

Individuals can. Popular Businesses in Amargosa Valley. Martell Market. W Amargosa Farm Rd, Amargosa Valley, NV Longstreet Inn Casino & RV Resort. HwyAmargosa Valley, NV Search for more Trending Searches in Amargosa Valley. Restaurants; Animal Rescue; Grocery Stores; Search for more Popular Categories HOME SERVICES.

Amargosa voles have turned out to be remarkably resilient. But these days, voles face more loss of habitat caused by development, ever-scarcer water and the growing impacts of climate change.The Amargosa Valley is the valley through which the Amargosa River flows south, in Nye County, southwestern Nevada and Inyo County in the state of south end is alternately called the "Amargosa River Valley'" or the "Tecopa Valley." Its northernmost point is around Beatty, Nevada and southernmost is Tecopa, California, where the Amargosa River enters into the Amargosa Canyon.The Amargosa vole inhabits discontinuous pockets of marsh along the Amargosa River between the towns of Shoshone and Tecopa—a rare section where surface flows are maintained year around.

The marshy areas, which range from less than 1 acre up to about 5 acres in size, are fed by perennial tributary springs and deep underground aquifers along the : K.